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Now sure how it came to be but 9/10 of the stuff on here is cyberpunk. It's a cyberpunk blog. Except when it's not. Then it's probably videogames, cartoons, anime, or technology related.
Posted on 11th Sep at 1:33 AM, with 145 notes
neurosciencestuff:

New Molecular Target is Key to Enhanced Brain Plasticity
As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, it kills brain cells mainly in the hippocampus and cortex, leading to impairments in “neuroplasticity,” the mechanism that affects learning, memory, and thinking. Targeting these areas of the brain, scientists hope to stop or slow the decline in brain plasticity, providing a novel way to treat Alzheimer’s. Groundbreaking new research has discovered a new way to preserve the flexibility and resilience of the brain.
The study, led by Tel Aviv University’s Prof. Illana Gozes and published in Molecular Psychiatry, reveals a nerve cell protective molecular target that is essential for brain plasticity. According to Prof. Gozes, “This discovery offers the world a new target for drug design and an understanding of mechanisms of cognitive enhancement.”
Prof. Gozes is the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors and director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU’s Sagol School of Neuroscience. Also contributing to the study were Dr. Saar Oz, Oxana Kapitansky, Yanina Ivashco-Pachima, Anna Malishkevich, Dr. Joel Hirsch, Dr. Rina Rosin-Arbersfeld, and their students, all from TAU. TAU staff scientists Dr. Eliezer Gildai and Dr. Leonid Mittelman provided the state-of-the-art molecular cloning and cellular protein imaging necessary for the study.
Building on past breakthroughs
The new finding is based on Prof. Gozes’ discovery of NAP, a snippet of a protein essential for brain formation (activity-dependent neuroprotective protein [ADNP]). As a result of this discovery, a drug candidate that showed efficacy in mild cognitive impairment patients, a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease, is being developed. NAP protects the brain by stabilizing microtubules — tiny cellular cylinders that provide “railways and scaffolding systems” to move biological material within cells and provide a cellular skeleton. Microtubules are of particular importance to nerve cells, which have long processes and would otherwise collapse. In neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, the microtubule network falls apart, hindering cellular communication and cognitive function.
"Clinical studies have shown that Davunetide (NAP) protects memory in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment preceding Alzheimer’s disease," said Prof. Gozes. "While the mechanism was understood in broad terms, the precise molecular target remained a mystery for years. Now, in light of our new research, we know why and we know how to proceed."
Stabilizing microtubules
The breakthrough was the discovery of the mechanism promoting microtubule growth at the tips of the tubes (“rails”). The researchers found that the NAP structure allows it to bind to the tip of the growing microtubule, the emerging “railway,” through specific microtubule end-binding proteins, which adhere to microtubules a bit like locomotors to provide for growth and forward movement, while the other end of the microtubule may to be disintegrating. These growing tips enlist regulatory proteins that are essential for providing plasticity at the nerve cell connection points, the synapses.
"We have now revealed that ADNP through its NAP motif binds the microtubule end binding proteins and enhances nerve cell plasticity, providing for brain resilience. We then discovered that NAP further enhances ADNP microtubule binding," said Prof. Gozes.
Researchers hope their discovery will help move Davunetide (NAP) and related compounds into further clinical trials, increasing the potential of future clinical use. Prof. Gozes is continuing to investigate microtubule end-binding proteins to better understand their protective properties in the brain.

neurosciencestuff:

New Molecular Target is Key to Enhanced Brain Plasticity

As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, it kills brain cells mainly in the hippocampus and cortex, leading to impairments in “neuroplasticity,” the mechanism that affects learning, memory, and thinking. Targeting these areas of the brain, scientists hope to stop or slow the decline in brain plasticity, providing a novel way to treat Alzheimer’s. Groundbreaking new research has discovered a new way to preserve the flexibility and resilience of the brain.

The study, led by Tel Aviv University’s Prof. Illana Gozes and published in Molecular Psychiatry, reveals a nerve cell protective molecular target that is essential for brain plasticity. According to Prof. Gozes, “This discovery offers the world a new target for drug design and an understanding of mechanisms of cognitive enhancement.”

Prof. Gozes is the incumbent of the Lily and Avraham Gildor Chair for the Investigation of Growth Factors and director of the Adams Super Center for Brain Studies at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine and a member of TAU’s Sagol School of Neuroscience. Also contributing to the study were Dr. Saar Oz, Oxana Kapitansky, Yanina Ivashco-Pachima, Anna Malishkevich, Dr. Joel Hirsch, Dr. Rina Rosin-Arbersfeld, and their students, all from TAU. TAU staff scientists Dr. Eliezer Gildai and Dr. Leonid Mittelman provided the state-of-the-art molecular cloning and cellular protein imaging necessary for the study.

Building on past breakthroughs

The new finding is based on Prof. Gozes’ discovery of NAP, a snippet of a protein essential for brain formation (activity-dependent neuroprotective protein [ADNP]). As a result of this discovery, a drug candidate that showed efficacy in mild cognitive impairment patients, a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease, is being developed. NAP protects the brain by stabilizing microtubules — tiny cellular cylinders that provide “railways and scaffolding systems” to move biological material within cells and provide a cellular skeleton. Microtubules are of particular importance to nerve cells, which have long processes and would otherwise collapse. In neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, the microtubule network falls apart, hindering cellular communication and cognitive function.

"Clinical studies have shown that Davunetide (NAP) protects memory in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment preceding Alzheimer’s disease," said Prof. Gozes. "While the mechanism was understood in broad terms, the precise molecular target remained a mystery for years. Now, in light of our new research, we know why and we know how to proceed."

Stabilizing microtubules

The breakthrough was the discovery of the mechanism promoting microtubule growth at the tips of the tubes (“rails”). The researchers found that the NAP structure allows it to bind to the tip of the growing microtubule, the emerging “railway,” through specific microtubule end-binding proteins, which adhere to microtubules a bit like locomotors to provide for growth and forward movement, while the other end of the microtubule may to be disintegrating. These growing tips enlist regulatory proteins that are essential for providing plasticity at the nerve cell connection points, the synapses.

"We have now revealed that ADNP through its NAP motif binds the microtubule end binding proteins and enhances nerve cell plasticity, providing for brain resilience. We then discovered that NAP further enhances ADNP microtubule binding," said Prof. Gozes.

Researchers hope their discovery will help move Davunetide (NAP) and related compounds into further clinical trials, increasing the potential of future clinical use. Prof. Gozes is continuing to investigate microtubule end-binding proteins to better understand their protective properties in the brain.

Posted on 11th Sep at 1:29 AM, with 8 notes
Adventure Time: The Secret of the Nameless Kingdom

makapixel:

If you like the animations on this page check out my portfolio here! I’ve worked on all 3 official Adventure Time games thus far.

http://makapixel.tumblr.com/post/71694014411/makapixel-portfolio-update 

They appear at 4:50 (http://youtu.be/Cv5MOMwzq_g?t=4m50s)

I animated those hairapes! As seen below lol(some of these animations are controlled with game engine so they won’t appear as they do in game)

Bouncing(bounce controlled with in game physics)

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Charge up

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Get hit

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Get up

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Knockdown

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Land(lands with physics, happens when hairape hits ground)

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Shock(attacking)

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Get spanked(destroy)

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I’ll add more animations when the characters are revealed :D

Posted on 11th Sep at 1:16 AM, with 155,770 notes

blinking-red-light:

"We heard a little girl… GOT SERIOUSLY BURNED!"

Posted on 7th Sep at 2:58 PM, with 696 notes
nathanielemmett:

Cloud and Aerith, just after he promised to be her bodyguard.(x)

nathanielemmett:

Cloud and Aerith, just after he promised to be her bodyguard.

(x)

Posted on 7th Sep at 2:57 PM, with 8,872 notes
tysonhesse:

Randomly remembered that it’s Digimon Adventure’s 15th anniversary this year.

tysonhesse:

Randomly remembered that it’s Digimon Adventure’s 15th anniversary this year.

Posted on 7th Sep at 2:56 PM, with 986 notes

futurescope:

Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies

In short, understandable words: Scientists have successfully transported words from one brain to another over the internet.

Abstract:

Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues.

[paper] [via @GF2045]

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