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Now sure how it came to be but 9/10 of the stuff on here is cyberpunk. It's a cyberpunk blog. Except when it's not. Then it's probably videogames, cartoons, anime, or technology related.
Posted on 30th Aug at 5:00 PM, with 409 notes
victoriousvocabulary:

RIPARIAN
[adjective]
1. of, pertaining to, or situated or dwelling on the bank of a river or other body of water; of the river.
[noun]
2. Law: a person who owns land on the bank of a natural watercourse or body of water. 
Etymology: from Latin rīpārius, from rīpa, “a river bank”.
[Autumn Skye Morrison - The Call of the River]

victoriousvocabulary:

RIPARIAN

[adjective]

1. of, pertaining to, or situated or dwelling on the bank of a river or other body of water; of the river.

[noun]

2. Law: a person who owns land on the bank of a natural watercourse or body of water. 

Etymology: from Latin rīpārius, from rīpa, “a river bank”.

[Autumn Skye Morrison - The Call of the River]

Posted on 26th Aug at 7:02 PM, with 97 notes
Radical New Theory Could Kill the Multiverse Hypothesis | Science | WIRED »

warrenellis:

"Though galaxies look larger than atoms and elephants appear to outweigh ants, some physicists have begun to suspect that size differences are illusory. Perhaps the fundamental description of the universe does not include the concepts of “mass” and “length,” implying that at its core, nature lacks a sense of scale."

Posted on 25th Aug at 10:29 PM, with 350 notes

the-daily-robot:

Laser-engraved Zero schematic light art, designed and fabricated by The Daily Robot.  Want something cool made just for you? Click that “Request Custom Order” button at my Etsy Shop!

Posted on 23rd Aug at 5:27 PM
Looking for a crash course in Neurolinguistics

Can any follower help out a fellow academic?

Posted on 23rd Aug at 5:17 PM, with 128 notes
siphersaysstuff:

Back at it! Scale chart for the Robot Masters of Mega Man 3. Heights according to “top of the skull” and “full figure” respectively, where appropriate.
As per usual, Magnet and Gemini are taken pretty much straight from their arcade sprites in relation to Mega, using the most “upright” poses I could find (typically jumping). Shadow Man is one area where I didn’t go with the sprite’s most “upright”, as that one frame of straight-legged posing put Shadow at seven feet tall.
That seemed excessive. So I knocked a foot off. That seemed fine.
The rest are, again as per usual, “feels right” guesses. I considered making Snake Man really tall, but then figured that keeping him on the shorter end would be better, since he was designed specifically to navigate small cramped spaces.
Needle Man’s nearly two feet of “crown” sure makes him look bigger than he is. Actually, that’s kind of a common thing with the Robot Master designs… they tend to have sticky-uppy bits on their helmets that really stack the extra inches on.

siphersaysstuff:

Back at it! Scale chart for the Robot Masters of Mega Man 3. Heights according to “top of the skull” and “full figure” respectively, where appropriate.

As per usual, Magnet and Gemini are taken pretty much straight from their arcade sprites in relation to Mega, using the most “upright” poses I could find (typically jumping). Shadow Man is one area where I didn’t go with the sprite’s most “upright”, as that one frame of straight-legged posing put Shadow at seven feet tall.

That seemed excessive. So I knocked a foot off. That seemed fine.

The rest are, again as per usual, “feels right” guesses. I considered making Snake Man really tall, but then figured that keeping him on the shorter end would be better, since he was designed specifically to navigate small cramped spaces.

Needle Man’s nearly two feet of “crown” sure makes him look bigger than he is. Actually, that’s kind of a common thing with the Robot Master designs… they tend to have sticky-uppy bits on their helmets that really stack the extra inches on.

Posted on 23rd Aug at 5:17 PM, with 250 notes
neurosciencestuff:

ADHD children make poor decisions due to less differentiated learning processes
Which shirt do we put on in the morning? Do we drive to work or take the train? From which takeaway joint do we want to buy lunch? We make hundreds of different decisions every day. Even if these often only have a minimal impact, it is extremely important for our long-term personal development to make decisions that are as optimal as possible. People with ADHD often find this difficult, however. They are known to make impulsive decisions, often choosing options which bring a prompt but smaller reward instead of making a choice that yields a greater reward later on down the line. Researchers from the University Clinics for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, now reveal that different decision-making processes are responsible for such suboptimal choices and that these take place in the middle of the frontal lobe.
Mathematical models help to understand the decision-making processes
In the study, the decision-making processes in 40 young people with and without ADHD were examined. Lying in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner to record the brain activity, the participants played a game where they had to learn which of two images carried more frequent rewards. In order to understand the impaired mechanisms of participants with ADHD better, learning algorithms which originally stemmed from the field of artificial intelligence were used to evaluate the data. These mathematical models help to understand the precise learning and decision-making mechanisms better. “We were able to demonstrate that young people with ADHD do not inherently have difficulties in learning new information; instead, they evidently use less differentiated learning patterns, which is presumably why sub-optimal decisions are often made”, says first author Tobias Hauser.
Multimodal imaging affords glimpses inside the brain
In order to study the brain processes that triggered these impairments, the authors used multimodal imaging methods, where the participants were examined using a combined measurement of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) to record the electrical activity and the blood flow in the brain. It became apparent that participants with ADHD exhibit an altered functioning in the medial prefrontal cortex – a region in the middle of the frontal lobe. This part of the brain is heavily involved in decision-making processes, especially if you have to choose between several options, and in learning from errors. Although a change in activity in this region was already discovered in other contexts for ADHD, the Zurich researchers were now also able to pinpoint the precise moment of this impairment, which already occurred less than half a second after a feedback, i.e. at a very early stage.
Psychologist Tobias Hauser, who is now researching at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, is convinced that the results fundamentally improve our understanding of the mechanisms of impaired decision-making behavior in people with ADHD. The next step will be to study the brain messenger substances. “If our findings are confirmed, they will provide key clues as to how we might be able to design therapeutic interventions in future,” explains Hauser.
Literature: 
Tobias U. Hauser, Reto Iannaccone, Juliane Ball, Christoph Mathys, Daniel Brandeis, Susanne Walitza & Silvia Brem: Role of Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Impaired Decision Making in Juvenile Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, in: JAMA Psychiatry

neurosciencestuff:

ADHD children make poor decisions due to less differentiated learning processes

Which shirt do we put on in the morning? Do we drive to work or take the train? From which takeaway joint do we want to buy lunch? We make hundreds of different decisions every day. Even if these often only have a minimal impact, it is extremely important for our long-term personal development to make decisions that are as optimal as possible. People with ADHD often find this difficult, however. They are known to make impulsive decisions, often choosing options which bring a prompt but smaller reward instead of making a choice that yields a greater reward later on down the line. Researchers from the University Clinics for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, now reveal that different decision-making processes are responsible for such suboptimal choices and that these take place in the middle of the frontal lobe.

Mathematical models help to understand the decision-making processes

In the study, the decision-making processes in 40 young people with and without ADHD were examined. Lying in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner to record the brain activity, the participants played a game where they had to learn which of two images carried more frequent rewards. In order to understand the impaired mechanisms of participants with ADHD better, learning algorithms which originally stemmed from the field of artificial intelligence were used to evaluate the data. These mathematical models help to understand the precise learning and decision-making mechanisms better. “We were able to demonstrate that young people with ADHD do not inherently have difficulties in learning new information; instead, they evidently use less differentiated learning patterns, which is presumably why sub-optimal decisions are often made”, says first author Tobias Hauser.

Multimodal imaging affords glimpses inside the brain

In order to study the brain processes that triggered these impairments, the authors used multimodal imaging methods, where the participants were examined using a combined measurement of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) to record the electrical activity and the blood flow in the brain. It became apparent that participants with ADHD exhibit an altered functioning in the medial prefrontal cortex – a region in the middle of the frontal lobe. This part of the brain is heavily involved in decision-making processes, especially if you have to choose between several options, and in learning from errors. Although a change in activity in this region was already discovered in other contexts for ADHD, the Zurich researchers were now also able to pinpoint the precise moment of this impairment, which already occurred less than half a second after a feedback, i.e. at a very early stage.

Psychologist Tobias Hauser, who is now researching at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, is convinced that the results fundamentally improve our understanding of the mechanisms of impaired decision-making behavior in people with ADHD. The next step will be to study the brain messenger substances. “If our findings are confirmed, they will provide key clues as to how we might be able to design therapeutic interventions in future,” explains Hauser.

Literature:

Tobias U. Hauser, Reto Iannaccone, Juliane Ball, Christoph Mathys, Daniel Brandeis, Susanne Walitza & Silvia Brem: Role of Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Impaired Decision Making in Juvenile Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, in: JAMA Psychiatry

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