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Now sure how it came to be but 9/10 of the stuff on here is cyberpunk. It's a cyberpunk blog. Except when it's not. Then it's probably videogames, cartoons, anime, or technology related.
Posted on 21st Oct at 1:06 AM, with 91,818 notes

adventuretimeandsuperjailrock:

If this isn’t good marketing I literally don’t want to know what is.

Posted on 20th Oct at 1:49 AM, with 4,478 notes

mxcleod:

when you’re a collection of organic molecules named carl saganimage

Posted on 20th Oct at 1:43 AM, with 14,696 notes

probertson:

more Giffany animations from Soos and the Real Girl

Posted on 10th Oct at 12:59 AM, with 11,898 notes

kuudererules:

Tetsuya Nomura’s take on Hatsune Miku

Today, as part of Hatsune Miku Expo 2014, Crypton Future Media will open a Hatsune Miku Art Exhibition dubbed “Universal Positivity” at the Wallplay event space in New York City. And Final Fantasy and Kingdom Hearts character designer Tetsuya Nomura is contributing.

Captured by Famitsu outside Wallplay this afternoon is a promotion for the gallery, and it’s made by none other than Nomura.

Posted on 7th Oct at 5:04 PM, with 2,477 notes

fleshcoatedtechnology:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

Follow our Tumblr

When the robot revolution comes they will remember this, puny human.

Posted on 7th Oct at 5:04 PM, with 56 notes
On Eugene Goostman passing the Turing Test

fleshcoatedtechnology:

casie-mod:

image

You may or may not have heard about Eugene Goostman, the computer program created by Vladimir Veselov, that has been lauded as achieving an important milestone in artificial intelligence by passing the Turing Test. This has been met with controversy; some say other chat bots have passed the test already, others think it’s not a big deal, and then there are those who say that this doesn’t even qualify as a pass at all. This stuff really interests me so I spent some time looking into it a bit… . .

Let me back up a bit and provide some super BRIEF reference for those who didn’t take Comp Sci 101 or read Neal Stephenson or William Gibson or otherwise don’t know about Alan Turing and the Turing Test (just in case). Alan Turing (1912 – 1954) was a mathematician widely considered as the Father of Artificial Intelligence and Computer Science. From him, we get the Turing Test, where Turing proposed that a computer could be said to “think” if a human interrogator could not tell it apart, through conversation, from a human being. This was proposed in 1950. http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/262954/

Onwards to the test…..

Here are some specifics for the testing Eugene Goostman was involved in that took place at the University of Reading (from their site):

http://www.reading.ac.uk/news-and-events/releases/PR583836.aspx

  • Simultaneous tests as specified by Alan Turing
  • Each judge was involved in five parallel tests - so 10 conversations
  • 30 judges took part
  • In total 300 conversations
  • In each five minutes a judge was communicating with both a human and a machine
  • Each of the five machines took part in 30 tests
  • To ensure accuracy of results, Test was independently adjudicated by Professor John Barnden, University of Birmingham, formerly head of British AI Society

The Eugene Goostman program itself was developed as a 13 year old Ukranian boy for whom English was a second language.

The qualification for passing the test would be if the program is mistaken for a human more than 30% of the time during a series of five minute keyboard conversations. (Although Turing himself didn’t actually specify the 30% criteria nor the 5 minute time limit).

Eugene convinced 33% of the judges.

Here’s a snippet of a conversation from a 2012 competition (Eugene’s been in development since 2001):

[16:11:25] Judge: what music do you like?

[16:11:32] Eugene: I like Eminem – because he doesn’t have a thing to do with “polite-correctness”.

[16:11:46] Judge: OMG i love eminem, he’s my favourite artist!

[16:12:00] Eugene: I wonder what Eminem’s nick mean. I associate it only with a word “enema”. But he is a cool guy, I like his “The Real Slim Shady”.

[16:12:55] Judge: i know what his nick name means, his real name is Marshall Mathers. From the initials M&M phynetically sounding like Eminem.

[16:13:06] Eugene: Eminem is a famous crapper. No, raper… ripper… Yeah, I mean - rapper. I like his “Stan” and “The Real Slim Shady”.

I think the first place where the controversy starts is simply with the Turing Test itself. When Turing proposed it, computers were thought of differently than we do today. PEOPLE were the computers, when tasked with adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing. The thought that machines could ever THINK like a human being at all was utterly foreign and nonsensical to the majority of people. Turing was in essence proposing a thought experiment.

This in turn makes the test itself rather arbitrary. There’s a difference between true cognition and simulation of human conversation aided by voluminous vocabulary variations and scripts. Some might interpret the test to be an indicator of sentience when it is really an inappropriate test for that. It is still certainly a stepping stone, though.

In addition, it’s pretty easy to game the requirements while still technically fulfilling them. Choosing the persona of 13 year old Ukranian boy for whom English was a second language obviously lowers the barriers to passing. Who your judges are matters as well. The sex chatbot Jenny18 (a modified version of ELIZA) managed to fool a whole lot of chat room users. With sexy results :P .

Even so, this event isn’t something I would discount because of the formal test environment and that the test is basically showing how gullible humans can be in a purely text situation. Chat bots that are convincing enough to steal people’s sensitive information are possible right now, whereas Skynet, not so much.

The iconic Turing Test itself though, seems outdated or at least, insufficient, to test what it is I think people in general really are thinking of when hearing about an event like this. Sentience. And of course that strikes at the root of something we’ve been striving to understand about ourselves for just about as long as we’ve existed. And step by step, we’ve made some progress in unraveling our own secrets. But as our understanding of human thought processes changes, so too, should the ways we test them.

image

"At first we say that 'if a computer could play chess that it would think like us', and then we get a computer to play chess and we say 'well that's really not thinking', and the answer is that we don’t really know what thinking is.  I would argue that machines do a pretty good job right now.. at thinking.

And they don’t do as good a job at creating, although we don’t really know what creating is.  And they don’t do a very good job at having a soul, but we don’t really know what a soul is.

 But when we can define it, computers do a pretty good job doing it.”

-Joseph M. Rosen

Posted on 7th Oct at 4:59 PM, with 79 notes

mendelpalace:

0x4e71:

well, that was unexpected.

From the documentary Europe in 8Bit.

Posted on 7th Oct at 4:54 PM, with 458 notes
wildcat2030:

Oxygen absorbing material may allow us to breathe underwater - Using specially synthesized crystalline materials, scientists from the University of Southern Denmark have created a substance that is able to absorb and store oxygen in such high concentrations that just one bucketful is enough to remove all of the oxygen in a room. The substance is also able to release the stored oxygen in a controlled manner when it is needed, so just a few grains could replace the need for divers to carry bulky scuba tanks. The key component of the new material is the element cobalt, which is bound in a specially designed organic molecule. In standard form – and depending on the available oxygen content, the ambient temperature, and the barometric pressure – the absorption of oxygen by the material from its surroundings may take anything from seconds to days. “An important aspect of this new material is that it does not react irreversibly with oxygen – even though it absorbs oxygen in a so-called selective chemisorptive process,” said Professor Christine McKenzie from the University of Southern Denmark. “The material is both a sensor, and a container for oxygen – we can use it to bind, store, and transport oxygen – like a solid artificial hemoglobin.” (via Oxygen absorbing material may allow us to breathe underwater)

wildcat2030:

Oxygen absorbing material may allow us to breathe underwater
-
Using specially synthesized crystalline materials, scientists from the University of Southern Denmark have created a substance that is able to absorb and store oxygen in such high concentrations that just one bucketful is enough to remove all of the oxygen in a room. The substance is also able to release the stored oxygen in a controlled manner when it is needed, so just a few grains could replace the need for divers to carry bulky scuba tanks. The key component of the new material is the element cobalt, which is bound in a specially designed organic molecule. In standard form – and depending on the available oxygen content, the ambient temperature, and the barometric pressure – the absorption of oxygen by the material from its surroundings may take anything from seconds to days. “An important aspect of this new material is that it does not react irreversibly with oxygen – even though it absorbs oxygen in a so-called selective chemisorptive process,” said Professor Christine McKenzie from the University of Southern Denmark. “The material is both a sensor, and a container for oxygen – we can use it to bind, store, and transport oxygen – like a solid artificial hemoglobin.” (via Oxygen absorbing material may allow us to breathe underwater)

Posted on 7th Oct at 4:52 PM, with 36 notes
Who, I wonder, will be the first to hit all of the buttons going up on the space elevator?
Posted on 7th Oct at 4:51 PM, with 150 notes
neurosciencestuff:

How Rabies “Hijacks” Neurons to Attack the Brain
Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body’s internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year.
For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus uses to efficiently enter the central nervous system, where it erupts in a toxic explosion of symptoms. The study, published in PLOS Pathogens, was conducted by Dr. Eran Perlson and Shani Gluska of TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, in collaboration with the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Germany.
"Rabies not only hijacks the nervous system’s machinery, it also manipulates that machinery to move faster," said Dr. Perlson. "We have shown that rabies enters a neuron in the peripheral nervous system by binding to a nerve growth factor receptor, responsible for the health of neurons, called p75. The difference is that its transport is very fast, even faster than that of its endogenous ligand, the small molecules that travel regularly along the neuron and keep the neuron healthy."
Faster than a speeding train
To track the rabies virus in the nervous system, the researchers grew mouse sensory neurons in an observation chamber and used live cell imaging to track the path taken by the virus particles. The researchers “saw” the virus hijack the “train” transporting cell components along a neuron and drove it straight into the spinal cord. Once in the spinal cord, the virus caught the first available train to the brain, where it wrought havoc before speeding through the rest of the body, shutting it down organ by organ.
Nerve cells, or neurons, outside the central nervous system are highly asymmetric. A long protrusion called an axon extends from the cell body to another nerve cell or organ along a specific transmission route. In addition to rapid transmission of electric impulses, axons also transport molecular materials over these distances.
"Axonal transport is a delicate and crucial process for neuronal survival, and when disrupted it can lead to neurodegenerative diseases," said Dr. Perlson. "Understanding how an organism such as rabies manipulates this machinery may help us in the future to either restore the process or even to manipulate it to our own therapeutic needs."
Hijacking the hijacker
"A tempting premise is to use this same machinery to introduce drugs or genes into the nervous system," Dr. Perlson added. By shedding light on how the virus hijacks the transport system in nerve cells to reach its target organ with maximal speed and efficiency, the researchers hope their findings will allow scientists to control the neuronal transport machinery to treat rabies and other neurodegenerative diseases.
Disruptions of the neuron train system also contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). According to Dr. Perlson, “An improved understanding of how the neuron train works could lead to new treatments for these disorders as well.”

neurosciencestuff:

How Rabies “Hijacks” Neurons to Attack the Brain

Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body’s internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year.

For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus uses to efficiently enter the central nervous system, where it erupts in a toxic explosion of symptoms. The study, published in PLOS Pathogens, was conducted by Dr. Eran Perlson and Shani Gluska of TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, in collaboration with the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Germany.

"Rabies not only hijacks the nervous system’s machinery, it also manipulates that machinery to move faster," said Dr. Perlson. "We have shown that rabies enters a neuron in the peripheral nervous system by binding to a nerve growth factor receptor, responsible for the health of neurons, called p75. The difference is that its transport is very fast, even faster than that of its endogenous ligand, the small molecules that travel regularly along the neuron and keep the neuron healthy."

Faster than a speeding train

To track the rabies virus in the nervous system, the researchers grew mouse sensory neurons in an observation chamber and used live cell imaging to track the path taken by the virus particles. The researchers “saw” the virus hijack the “train” transporting cell components along a neuron and drove it straight into the spinal cord. Once in the spinal cord, the virus caught the first available train to the brain, where it wrought havoc before speeding through the rest of the body, shutting it down organ by organ.

Nerve cells, or neurons, outside the central nervous system are highly asymmetric. A long protrusion called an axon extends from the cell body to another nerve cell or organ along a specific transmission route. In addition to rapid transmission of electric impulses, axons also transport molecular materials over these distances.

"Axonal transport is a delicate and crucial process for neuronal survival, and when disrupted it can lead to neurodegenerative diseases," said Dr. Perlson. "Understanding how an organism such as rabies manipulates this machinery may help us in the future to either restore the process or even to manipulate it to our own therapeutic needs."

Hijacking the hijacker

"A tempting premise is to use this same machinery to introduce drugs or genes into the nervous system," Dr. Perlson added. By shedding light on how the virus hijacks the transport system in nerve cells to reach its target organ with maximal speed and efficiency, the researchers hope their findings will allow scientists to control the neuronal transport machinery to treat rabies and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Disruptions of the neuron train system also contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). According to Dr. Perlson, “An improved understanding of how the neuron train works could lead to new treatments for these disorders as well.”

Posted on 7th Oct at 4:19 PM, with 185,558 notes
tastefullyoffensive:

Why we shouldn’t travel to other planets.

tastefullyoffensive:

Why we shouldn’t travel to other planets.

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